Formation Of Political Parties Essay

Political Parties Essay

Although ideology has only played a minor role in Canadian federal politics, we can still illustrate major distinctions between each of the dominating and active parties by their beliefs or values. Political parties seek control of government in order to carry out their ideas of what public policy should be. In Canada, federal parties have varied considerably in terms of how they have complied with a constant set of ideas; that is, some have been ideological while others have been pragmatic.

According to Carty, Liberals believe that the rights of an individual are more important than the rights of the state (Carty 180). They believe that the individual should be given the chance to shape their own lives and reach the limit of their own potential. Another tenet of the Liberal ideology is equality of the human condition (i.e. equality employment, education, and training regardless of color, creed, sex, or family background). However, Chamber states that the Liberal party in fact is not ideological at all, "the Liberal party will say anything and do anything to win power" (Chamber 59). This is a definition of a pragmatic political party one who thinks of the way, to win the popular vote thinking only of short-term solutions rather than long-term goals.

The New Democratic Party emphasizes justice and seeks fundamental change to our present economics, politics, and social agendas (Chambers 64). This political party is one of the more idealistic party in its underlying beliefs, which has specific goals for social change. The primary purpose of the New Democratic Party is to offer a vision for Canada where the individuals come first; and to present a clear socialist political alternative. The New Democratic Party believe in the elimination of the capitalist economic problems. This particular party also strongly holds its view and rarely, if ever, seeks to compromise. Their firm political standpoint illustrates a political party that will not surrender their beliefs merely to receive an electoral victory.

In a similar comparison with another political organization such as the Progressive Conservatives party, their beliefs are also held strong and firm with the exceptions of different ideas and views. This political party has a more traditional approach towards social problems that plague the society. The

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Essay The Rise of Political Parties

533 Words3 Pages

In 1790, the United States had just recently broke free from the British crown and united under the cause of liberty. But in spite of this, Americans saw political rifts brought about by the rise of political parties. The rise of political parties in 1790 was caused by general distrust, disagreements on policies, and constitutional disagreements between the Federalist and Democratic-Republican parties, which were led by Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson, respectively. The rise of political parties was facilitated by general distrust amongst politicians. In document 1, Thomas Jefferson claims that Hamilton is in support of a monarchy. This statement reflects Jefferson's distrust for Hamilton, believing that he is trying to regress…show more content…

In 1790, the United States had just recently broke free from the British crown and united under the cause of liberty. But in spite of this, Americans saw political rifts brought about by the rise of political parties. The rise of political parties in 1790 was caused by general distrust, disagreements on policies, and constitutional disagreements between the Federalist and Democratic-Republican parties, which were led by Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson, respectively. The rise of political parties was facilitated by general distrust amongst politicians. In document 1, Thomas Jefferson claims that Hamilton is in support of a monarchy. This statement reflects Jefferson's distrust for Hamilton, believing that he is trying to regress America back into a pre-revolution monarchy. Hamilton, on the other hand, states in document 2 that James Madison and Thomas Jefferson are both subversive of the principles of good government, and are dangerous to the Union. This statement expresses Hamilton's distrust with Madison and Jefferson, who happened to be on the political party opposite to that of Hamilton's. In statement 4, George Washington also warns against the distrust brought about by forming political parties. He states that political parties bring about jealousy and hatred for one another, which is a defining factor for the Federalist and Democratic-Republican parties. In addition to general distrust, policy disagreements had also led to the rise of political parties. In

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