Essay On Greek Religion History

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Greek gods represented many things, and some came from many other religions surrounding Greece. However, they all had a job, and they all have many worshippers depending on everyone’s situation. If you were near death you might pray to Hades, if you were a blacksmith wishing to craft great armor or weapons, Hephaestus is your god. Theres a god for any problem, which is why they closely related to the nature of man. Each god has a job to make people’s problems go away, and to punish others. If the punishment is unfit then Zeus can keep that god in check, keeping order, being king of the gods, associated with lightning. After overthrowing his father Cronus, he took charge, and gave jobs to the current gods of that time, such as giving…show more content…

Artists for improvement, doctors for help healing people, or even people in general to rid them of illness. While Apollo is god of the sun, his twin sister Artemis took up the moon along with the hunt, wilderness, animals, childbirth, young girls, and like her brother, plague. So these siblings each had a bit of control over illness, but besides that had a few unrelated jobs. Artemis would most likely be prayed to by hunters for either safety, or a nice bounty. Along with women having children, most likely in hopes of not dying due to the fact that childbirth wasn’t something everyone made it through back then. And finally by young girls, for the simple fact that she dealt with them.
Ares being the god of war, violence, and bloodshed, would most likely be prayed to by warriors going into a battle. Not for safety, but for a great fight. If they wanted safety they would pray to Athena, goddess of wisdom and battle strategy, also Ares’s female counterpart. Even though they may deal closely with each other, they wouldn’t be the same. Athena gives a survivalist approach to battle, using wisdom to win. While Ares would use brute force and anger to overpower opponents. Probably why Athena had a city named after her.
Farmers would without a doubt pray to Demeter, goddess of harvest, growth and nourishment. She alone controlled pretty much everyones food source. Which is why when she fell to grieving, a massive famine took place, making the world

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Terracotta aryballos (oil flask)

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Bronze Herakles

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Bronze mirror with a support in the form of a nude girl

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Terracotta column-krater (bowl for mixing wine and water)

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Terracotta kylix (drinking cup)

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Terracotta Panathenaic prize amphora

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Terracotta amphora (jar)

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Terracotta Panathenaic prize amphora

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Terracotta statuette of Nike, the personification of victory

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Terracotta lekythos (oil flask)

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Terracotta kylix (drinking cup)

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Terracotta lekythos (oil flask)

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Terracotta stamnos (jar)

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Terracotta lekythos (oil flask)

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Terracotta lekythos (oil flask)

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Marble head of a woman wearing diadem and veil

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Terracotta oinochoe: chous (jug)

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Gold ring

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The Ganymede Jewelry

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Set of jewelry

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Gold stater

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Marble head of Athena

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Bronze statue of Eros sleeping

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Ten marble fragments of the Great Eleusinian Relief

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Limestone statue of a veiled female votary

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Marble head of a deity wearing a Dionysiac fillet

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Marble statue of an old woman

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Marble statuette of young Dionysos

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